Which Group to Credit (and Blame)? Whites Make Attributions about White-Minority Biracials’ Successes and Failures Based on Their Own (Anti-)Egalitarianism and Ethnic Identification, Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

Abstract

Individuals’ perceptions of biracials can vary based on the motives of the perceiver. Here, we examine how two factors—perceivers’ group-level identification motives and their system-level beliefs about the desirability of hierarchy (i.e., social dominance orientation)—predict the degree to which they attribute a biracial target’s successes or failures to that target’s White versus minority backgrounds. Across three studies examining different contexts, more anti-egalitarian White participants and (independently) more highly identified White participants rated a half- White, half-minority target as being shaped more by his minority (vs. White) background when he was disreputable (vs. reputable), patterns broadly consistent with prior theorizing on the motivations to maintain social stratification and protect ingroup standing respectively. In direct contrast, however, egalitarian White participants and (independently) White participants low on ethnic identification credited a target’s outgroup minority background when he was reputable (vs. disreputable), consistent with a desire to promote social equality and forgoing the opportunity to “bask in reflected glory” on behalf of the ingroup. Our results extend theorizing by underlining the benefits of jointly considering both group- and system-level motives when considering perceptions and attributions of individuals and groups, and by shedding new light on the understudied psychology of social egalitarians.

Type

Article

Author(s)

Kaylene McClanahan, Arnold Ho, Nour Kteily

Date Published

2018

Citations

McClanahan, Kaylene, Arnold Ho, and Nour Kteily. 2018. Which Group to Credit (and Blame)? Whites Make Attributions about White-Minority Biracials’ Successes and Failures Based on Their Own (Anti-)Egalitarianism and Ethnic Identification. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.

KELLOGG INSIGHT

Explore leading research and ideas

Find articles, podcast episodes, and videos that spark ideas in lifelong learners, and inspire those looking to advance in their careers.
learn more

COURSE CATALOG

Review Courses & Schedules

Access information about specific courses and their schedules by viewing the interactive course scheduler tool.
LEARN MORE

DEGREE PROGRAMS

Discover the path to your goals

Whether you choose our Full-Time, Part-Time or Executive MBA program, you’ll enjoy the same unparalleled education, exceptional faculty and distinctive culture.
learn more